The Renwick Memorial (The Response) Newcastle

The Renwick Memorial, (The Response) at Barras Bridge, Newcastle, is considered to be one of the finest of its kind in the country. Unveiled by the Prince of Wales as part of a visit that he made to the city in July 1923. The memorial was commissioned by Sir George and Lady Renwick and given to the city in 1923 to commemorate three events: the raising of the Commercial Battalion of the Northumberland Fusiliers; the return of the five Renwick sons from the war; and Sir George Renwick’s attainment of 50 years of commercial life on Newcastle Quayside.

Described by Alan Borg, a former Director General of the Imperial War Museum as “one of the finest sculptural ensembles on any British monument.” Goscombe John (see also Port Sunlight War Memorial) designed ‘The Response 1914′ as a narrative sculpture depicting soldiers marching off to war watched by ‘Renown’ while women and children bid them farewell.

 

image image image image image image image image image image image image image image image image

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War poetry today

You can add your own war poem directly to the warpoetry website by using this page.

The page is for poetry based in some way on war experience or for poetry which expresses personal concern with war in the modern world.  Click in the  “Leave a reply” box at the bottom of this page and paste in your poem(s). I suggest you start with a title such as the war you are concerned with, or your name, or the title of the first poem you are adding.

There’s an easy and quick registration process just to prevent spammers. Your email address will never be passed on to someone else, but I will use it to contact you if someone makes a request to use one of your poems in some way.

Information about the poet or the experience or event that gave you the idea for the poem or series of poems is always welcome.

If you know the date the poem was written this might be added too. The copyright of the poem belongs to the author.

Click on “Post comment” when you have added your text.

David Roberts, Website editor.

The Port Sunlight War Memorial (“The Defence of the Home”)

The Port Sunlight War Memorial
Port Sunlight Village on the Wirral, Merseyside UK
Unveiled on 3 December 1921 by Sgt E.G. Eames of Port Sunlight, who had been blinded at the first Battle of the Somme in 1916, and by Pte R E Cruickshank of Levers’ London branch, who had been awarded the Victoria Cross in 1918 for conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty in Palestine.
Sculptor  Sir William Goscombe John 1860-1952
Sculpture depicts the ‘Defence of Home’ with relief panels of wounded 
soldiers being cared for, sailors and anti-aircraft gunners (with bi-planes in the background)
WW1 was the first war in which aircraft were used on a large scale.
Tethered observation balloons had already been used in earlier conflicts for artillery location. 
Germany deployed Zeppelins for reconnaissance over the North Sea and  bombing raids 
over England. Military planners soon realised that pilots could locate enemy lines, although relaying information back to those on the ground proved problematic, it was the beginning of  aerial warfare.

image image image image

image image image image image image image image image image

 

 

 

 

Thornton-Clevelys War Memorial.

Thorton-Clevleys War Memorial on Woodlands Avenue in the town of Thorton-Clevleys, Lancashire, UK
Sculptor Albert Toft (1862-1949)
Toft’s work is described as Idealist but he said of himself that “to become an idealist you must necessarily first be a realist”.
unveiled 1922

The Contemplative Infantryman

The inverted rifle with bayonet signals a time for prayer, a break in the action to pay tribute the fallen

The inverted rifle with bayonet signals a time for prayer, a break in the action to pay tribute the fallen

Almost hidden from view the back of the memorial shows the reality of war. Gas mask and helmet always close by

Almost hidden from view the back of the memorial shows the reality of war. Gas mask and helmet always close by

The same statue appears on several other war memorials — at Stone in Staffordshire, Leamington in Warwickshire

© Marguerite Rami

© Marguerite Rami

 

Blackpool War Memorial

Blackpool War Memorial
Located on Princes Parade alongside North Pier in the town of Blackpool, Lancashire, UK
Unveiled on 10th November 1923
Sculptor Gilbert Ledward 1888-1960
Born in Chelsea London, his father Richard Arthur Ledward was a sculptor and modeller, his mother came from Staffordshire master potters and figure makers.
There are two main relief panels entitled 1914 and 1918. The 1914 panel has suffered from extensive corrosion.

War on an industrial scale

War on an industrial scale

Mother and child holding onto to father who is called to War

Mother and child holding onto to father who is called to War

Complete 1918 Panel

Complete 1918 Panel

The depiction (detail taken from the 1918 panel above) of a German soldier ensnared by barbed wire being trampled underfoot, is understandable within the memorials historical context, but perhaps uncomfortably triumphant from today's perspective.

The depiction (detail taken from the 1918 panel above) of a German soldier ensnared by barbed wire being trampled underfoot, is understandable within the memorials historical context, but perhaps uncomfortably triumphant from today’s perspective.

© Marguerite Rami

© Marguerite Rami

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bolton War Memorial

Bolton War Memorial ‘Peace Restraining War’ and ‘Peace Seeing the Horrors of War’ in Victoria Sq. Lancashire, UK
There are no names engraved on the memorial.

Sculptor Walter Marsden   ( Military Cross )1882 – 1969 (see St Anne’s War Memorial) unveiled on July 4th 1928 by the Earl of Derby. The two bronze figures by Walter Marsden were added in 1933. It was said that Marsden took so long to complete the memorial because he was waiting for inspiration

Peace Restraining War

Peace Restraining War

 

War imploring Peace to let him fight

War imploring Peace to let him fight

 

The Death of War

The Death of War

 

Peace Looks at the Horror of War

Peace Looks at the Horror of War

 

The cross is overlaid with the sword of a crusader

The cross is overlaid with the sword of a crusader

© Marguerite Rami

© Marguerite Rami