Southport War Memorial

Southport War Memorial in London Square Memorial Gardens, Southport Merseyside. The design was the result of  a national competition judged by Sir Reginald Blomfield  of the Imperial War Graves Commission, who was also the  architect and designer of the Menin Gate, Ypres. Unveiled on 18 November 1923 by the Earl of Derby.

Sculptor Herbert Tyson Smith  (1883–1972) See also Accrington Memorial and the Liverpool Cenotaph. This is a complex memorial laid out as a central obelisk on which is carved; LOOK UPWARD STANDING MUTE. SALUTE the last two lines of Barry Pain’s Armistice Day poem (The Army of the Dead) There are  two large colonnades each containing a small chapel at each end. There are four circular pedestals which have carved figures and the names of the fallen. Wall panels are named for the battles they commemorate. To each side of the colonnades are memorial gardens with fountains. On the west face of the northern colonnade Britannia is shown holding a sword in one hand whist holding a small statue of winged victory. On the west face of the southern colonnade Britannia is mourning as she lays a wreath over a soldiers helmet. Full of literary and poetic references the various inscriptions read;

THEIR PORTION IS WITH THE ETERNAL by Laurence Binyon.

THEY DIED THAT WE MIGHT LIVE. WE LIVE ONLY AS WE SAFEGUARD THE IDEALS FOR WHICH THEY DIED. FREEDOM JUSTICE MERCY. SO LET US  LIVE THAT WE MAY SHARE WITH THEM THE LIFE ETERNAL  by Frederick Riley.

ON THE DECK OF FAME THEY DIED by Thomas Campbell’s Battle of the Baltic.

FAITHFUL TO HER WE FELL AND REST CONTENT adaptation of the  epitaph of Simonides on the Spartans who fell at Thermopylae

TO FAMOUS MEN ALL EARTHS IS SEPULCHRE translation by Thucydides in his book of the funeral oration spoken by Pericles about the Athenians who fell in the first year of the Peloponnesian War.

ALL THAT THEY HAD THEY GAVE by Rudyard Kipling from The Kings Pilgrim

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Clayton-le-Moors War Memorial

 

Clayton-le-Moors War Memorial is located in Mercer Park, Clayton-le-Moors, in Lancashire. Unveiled on 6 November 1920 by Major-General A. Solly-Flood.

Sculptor John Cassidy (1860 – 1939) born in Littlewood, Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland. The allegorical female figure  of ‘Victory’ seems to be showing the soldier the way.

Clapton-le-Moors War Memorial

Clayton-le-Moors War Memorial

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Haslingden, Oswaldtwistle, Clitheroe & Rawtenstall War Memorials

Haslingden War Memorial in Greenfield Memorial Gardens, Haslingden, in Lancashire. Unveiled in 1924.

The Oswaldtwistle War  Memorial is on Rhyddings Street, Oswaldtwistle, in Lancashire.  Victory  is shown standing on a globe with a  soldier defending a wounded comrade.  There are two bronze figures seated on the ships which project from the pedestal. These figures represent the Royal Navy and the Royal Air Force.  Unveiled on 14 January 1922 by Major General H Shoubridge.

Clitheroe War Memorial located within the grounds of Clitheroe Castle, in Lancashire. Unveiled in 1923. 

The Rawtenstall War Memorial in Rawtenstall, Lancashire. Stands in St Marys Church Memorial Gardens, St Marys Way. It features a obelisk with bronze reliefs beneath. These show various figures including  soldiers, sailors, airmen, a farmer, a miner, a nurse, a fisherman, a medical orderly, a railwayman, a labourer and a mother with child.

Sculptor of all four memorials is  Louis Frederick Roslyn, born Louis Frederick Roselieb, (1878-1934) son of George Louis Roselieb, a German sculptor. During his military service he changed his name to Roslyn.

Haslingden War Memorial

Haslingden War Memorial

Haslingden War Memorial

Haslingden War Memorial

 

Haslingden War Memorial

Haslingden War Memorial

Oswaldtwistle War Memorial

Oswaldtwistle War Memorial

Oswaldtwistle War Memorial

Oswaldtwistle War Memorial

Oswaldtwistle War Memorial

Oswaldtwistle War Memorial

Clitheroe War Memorial

Clitheroe War Memorial

Clitheroe War Memorial

Clitheroe War Memorial

Clitheroe War Memorial

Clitheroe War Memorial

 

Rawtenstall War Memorial

Rawtenstall War Memorial

Rawtenstall War Memorial

Rawtenstall War Memorial

Rawtenstall War Memorial

Rawtenstall War Memorial

Rawtenstall War Memorial

Rawtenstall War Memorial

Rawtenstall War Memorial

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Accrington War Memorial

The Accrington  War Memorial is in the town of Accrington, Lancashire, UK. It is situated within Oak Hill Park near the Hollins Lane entrance. Built as memorial to those who fell in the First World War, it was unveiled by H. H. Bolton on the first of July 1922. The memorial is a Grade II listed structure, designed by Sir Charles Reilly. It shows the figure of ‘Grief’ holding a wreath and palm leaf.

Sculpture:  George Herbert Tyson Smith (1883–1972), was born in Liverpool. (see also the Liverpool War Memorial, and the Southport War Memorial)

Accrington is  known for the loss of the “Accrington Pals” on the opening day of the Battle of the Somme on 1st July 1916, 235 of the battalion were killed, and a further 350 wounded, 17 of them fatally, all within 30 minuets. One of the battalion’s signallers, observing from the rear, reported:

“We were able to see our comrades move forward in an attempt to cross No Man’s Land, only to be mown down like meadow grass. I felt sick at the sight of the carnage and remember weeping.
'Grief' Accrington War Memorial

‘Grief’ Accrington War Memorial

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Exchange Newsroom War Memorial Liverpool

The Exchange Newsroom War Memorial, in the city of Liverpool
The monument was originally unveiled by the 17th Earl of Derby on 1st January 1924 at Derby House, Liverpool. It was moved in 1953 when the original Exchange building was rebuilt.
Sculptor Joseph Philips
PRO PATRIA
1914 – 1919 In remembrance of members of the Liverpool exchange
newsroom, who gave their lives for right and freedom.
Britannia stands  wearing a breastplate and helmet, covered by a  cloak and holding a trident, and sheltering a small girl. Below are depicted three soldiers, a sailor, and a nurse who tends to one of the soldiers.
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© Marguerite Rami

© Marguerite Rami

 

The Cenotaph Liverpool

The Cenotaph stands outside St Georges Hall on Lime Street in the city of Liverpool.
The Cenotaph on St George’s Plateau is unusual for a war memorial, its long low shape was designed to harmoniously fit the backdrop of St George’s Hall.
Designed by architect Lionel Budden.
Sculptor Herbert Tyson Smith (1883–1972) born in Liverpool, (see also Accrington War Memorial)
It was unveiled on the 11th November 1930, and consists of a simple horizontal block with two bronze reliefs each measuring over 31 feet. On one side those who have come to mourn the dead, whilst on the other the men of the Army, Navy, and the Royal Flying Corps marching off to fight. The inscription reads “To the men of Liverpool who fell in the Great War, and the victory that day was turned into mourning unto all the people”.
Mourning those who have died

Mourning those who have died

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© Marguerite Rami

© Marguerite Rami

Liverpool Hero’s Memorial to Victoria Cross recipients

Located in Liverpool’s Chavasse Park,  Abercromby Square, in the city of Liverpool.  Unveiled in 2008 to commemorate Noel Chavasse and fifteen other Victoria Cross recipients.

Sculptor Tom Murphy

The statue depicts Chavasse and a stretcher-bearer from the Liverpool Scottish Battalion rescuing a wounded soldier. Born in 1884, Noel and his twin brother, Christopher, sons of the Bishop of Liverpool grew up with a profound sense of duty to others. Noel qualified as a doctor in 1912. He became a Captain in the territorial army and was awarded the VC twice during the First World War (known as ‘the VC and Bar’) for extraordinary actions in rescuing and treating wounded soldiers on the battlefield, at great risk to his own life. He was also awarded a Military Cross. His second VC was awarded posthumously. Captain Chavasse died on 4 August 1917, at the age of 32, and is buried at Brandhoek New Military Cemetery in Belgium.

Captain Chavasse  is quoted as saying “I do not intend to run any risk at all, unnecessarily; my blood is not heroic.”

 

Captain Noel Chavasse helping the wounded

Captain Noel Chavasse helping the wounded

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The Renwick Memorial (The Response) Newcastle

The Renwick Memorial, (The Response) at Barras Bridge, Newcastle, is considered to be one of the finest of its kind in the country. Unveiled by the Prince of Wales as part of a visit that he made to the city in July 1923. The memorial was commissioned by Sir George and Lady Renwick and given to the city in 1923 to commemorate three events: the raising of the Commercial Battalion of the Northumberland Fusiliers; the return of the five Renwick sons from the war; and Sir George Renwick’s attainment of 50 years of commercial life on Newcastle Quayside.

Described by Alan Borg, a former Director General of the Imperial War Museum as “one of the finest sculptural ensembles on any British monument.” Goscombe John (see also Port Sunlight War Memorial) designed ‘The Response 1914′ as a narrative sculpture depicting soldiers marching off to war watched by ‘Renown’ while women and children bid them farewell.

 

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The Port Sunlight War Memorial (“The Defence of the Home”)

The Port Sunlight War Memorial
Port Sunlight Village on the Wirral, Merseyside UK
Unveiled on 3 December 1921 by Sgt E.G. Eames of Port Sunlight, who had been blinded at the first Battle of the Somme in 1916, and by Pte R E Cruickshank of Levers’ London branch, who had been awarded the Victoria Cross in 1918 for conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty in Palestine.
Sculptor  Sir William Goscombe John 1860-1952
Sculpture depicts the ‘Defence of Home’ with relief panels of wounded 
soldiers being cared for, sailors and anti-aircraft gunners (with bi-planes in the background)
WW1 was the first war in which aircraft were used on a large scale.
Tethered observation balloons had already been used in earlier conflicts for artillery location. 
Germany deployed Zeppelins for reconnaissance over the North Sea and  bombing raids 
over England. Military planners soon realised that pilots could locate enemy lines, although relaying information back to those on the ground proved problematic, it was the beginning of  aerial warfare.

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Thornton-Clevelys War Memorial.

Thorton-Clevleys War Memorial on Woodlands Avenue in the town of Thorton-Clevleys, Lancashire, UK
Sculptor Albert Toft (1862-1949)
Toft’s work is described as Idealist but he said of himself that “to become an idealist you must necessarily first be a realist”.
unveiled 1922

The Contemplative Infantryman

The inverted rifle with bayonet signals a time for prayer, a break in the action to pay tribute the fallen

The inverted rifle with bayonet signals a time for prayer, a break in the action to pay tribute the fallen

Almost hidden from view the back of the memorial shows the reality of war. Gas mask and helmet always close by

Almost hidden from view the back of the memorial shows the reality of war. Gas mask and helmet always close by

The same statue appears on several other war memorials — at Stone in Staffordshire, Leamington in Warwickshire

© Marguerite Rami

© Marguerite Rami